Monday, October 13, 2014
overzealousgirl:

Australian scientists have used a 3D bioprinter to create artificial vascular networks that imitate the body’s circulatory system.

Recently bioprinters have been used to produce thicker and healthier human tissue, and to print stem cell structures for use in new osteoarthritis treatments. Researchers from the Queensland University of Technology in Australia are right now working on using 3D-printed scaffolds and fat cells to regenerate breast tissue in women who have had mastectomies, and they say the technology will be in hospitals within five years. 
[…]
It’s hoped that this technology will allow for patients to walk into a hospital and have an entire organ custom-made for them, and printed with all the cells, proteins and blood vessels in the right places.

Source.

My arteries are broken thanks to a disease called Takayasu’s Arteritis. Fixing them would be awesome.

overzealousgirl:

Australian scientists have used a 3D bioprinter to create artificial vascular networks that imitate the body’s circulatory system.

Recently bioprinters have been used to produce thicker and healthier human tissue, and to print stem cell structures for use in new osteoarthritis treatments. Researchers from the Queensland University of Technology in Australia are right now working on using 3D-printed scaffolds and fat cells to regenerate breast tissue in women who have had mastectomies, and they say the technology will be in hospitals within five years. 

[…]

It’s hoped that this technology will allow for patients to walk into a hospital and have an entire organ custom-made for them, and printed with all the cells, proteins and blood vessels in the right places.

Source.

My arteries are broken thanks to a disease called Takayasu’s Arteritis. Fixing them would be awesome.

nubbsgalore:

photos by matt smith from the Illawarra coast in new south wales of bluebottles, violet snails and blue dragons. 

despite its resemblance to the jellyfish, the bluebottle is more closely related to coral. known as a zooid, the bluebottle (or portugese man of war) is a colonial animal composed of many highly specialized and physiologically integrated individual organisms incapable of independent survival. 

the blue dragon — a type of nudibranch, here no larger than a thumbnail, with its own potent sting — is able to eat the nematocysts (stinging cells) of the bluebottle without discharging them and internally relocate them to the tips of each one of the fingers you can see in the pictures.

for their part, the violet snails also feed on the bluebottles.

notes matt, “despite their potentially dangerous sting, the bluebottle is an amazingly beautiful creature. with strong winds, hundreds of these cnidaria are blown into the bays around my home town and trapped overnight.”

this allows him to capture the above shots, which he creates with use of a fluorescent tube in his strobe light and a homemade waterproof lens dome.

starbuqzz said: Why is yawning contagious?

science:

Mirror neurons, These are neurons with a curious property: they fire both when you do something, but also when you observe the same action in others. Much speculation surrounds the functional role of mirror neurons, and in particular how they might factor into developing empathy, and whether defects in the mirror neuron system could contribute to autistic spectrum disorders, which are characterized by poor cognitive empathy.

In this instance, we’re seeing a primitive kind of “motor empathy,” which might underlie cognitive empathy, our ability to understand others’ thoughts, feelings, motivations and so on from their outward behavior. Brodmann’s area 9, a part of the mirror neuron system in the brain, lit up when test subjects engaged in contagious yawning. This area of the brain has also been implicated in mentalizing, i.e., precisely in understanding other people’s mental states. Interestingly, in people with Major Depressive Disorder, we have found neurons in this area to be smaller, and glia—the support cells which are more numerous than neurons, and increasingly are understood to play more than just a passive role in thought—to be fewer and further between.

It remains to be seen exactly what role mirror neurons play in human empathy, but they’re certainly interesting. It’s fascinating that not only we can automatically do something because we saw someone else do it; this automatic act is caused by parts of our perfectly healthy brain not being able to distinguish between ourselves and our fellow human beings.

scienceisbeauty:

The importance of teamwork. The insects were caught on camera forming a tower to reach the top of a bird cage they were being kept in.
Source: Escape ants are a tower of strength (Daily Express)

scienceisbeauty:

The importance of teamwork. The insects were caught on camera forming a tower to reach the top of a bird cage they were being kept in.

Source: Escape ants are a tower of strength (Daily Express)

physicsshiny:

man-eatingcat:

movsi:

corophagia:

The Central Nervous System, containing the brain and spinal cord.

This is who you are.

pretty much

This actually gives rise to what you perceive as “you”.

physicsshiny:

man-eatingcat:

movsi:

corophagia:

The Central Nervous System, containing the brain and spinal cord.

This is who you are.

pretty much

This actually gives rise to what you perceive as “you”.

(Source: 365daysofhorror)

mindblowingscience:

Elephants Have 2,000 Genes for Smell—Most Ever Found

Posted by Christine Dell’Amore of National Geographic in Weird & Wild on July 22, 2014
We’ve long known that African elephants have a great sense of smell—but a new study shows that the large mammals have truly superior schnozzes.
Compared with 13 other mammal species studied, African elephants have the most genes related to smell: 2,000.
That’s the most ever discovered in an animal—more than twice the number of olfactory genes in domestic dogs and five times more than in humans, who have about 400, according to research published July 22 in the journal Genome Research. The previous record-holder was rats, which have about 1,200 genes dedicated to smell.

Continue Reading.

mindblowingscience:

Elephants Have 2,000 Genes for Smell—Most Ever Found

Posted by Christine Dell’Amore of National Geographic in Weird & Wild on July 22, 2014

We’ve long known that African elephants have a great sense of smell—but a new study shows that the large mammals have truly superior schnozzes.

Compared with 13 other mammal species studied, African elephants have the most genes related to smell: 2,000.

That’s the most ever discovered in an animal—more than twice the number of olfactory genes in domestic dogs and five times more than in humans, who have about 400, according to research published July 22 in the journal Genome ResearchThe previous record-holder was rats, which have about 1,200 genes dedicated to smell.

Continue Reading.

thatssoscience:

bbcnewsus:

"Failure is not an option"
Alyssa Carson, 13, is determined to be the first person to land on Mars.
This is more than wishful thinking - Nasa thinks she has a chance and she’s already in training.

This little girl is my hero

thatssoscience:

bbcnewsus:

"Failure is not an option"

Alyssa Carson, 13, is determined to be the first person to land on Mars.

This is more than wishful thinking - Nasa thinks she has a chance and she’s already in training.

This little girl is my hero